Part 3: Master Bedroom Closet Final Reveal

There’s nothing like completing a project! That sense of accomplishment is so energizing and propels you to the next thing. Even more, decluttering a space that was causing daily stress has made my life so much better!

Your home is living space, not storage space.

Francine Jay

When I walk into my closet, I feel so much more peace. I can easily see my clothes, and picking out something to wear feels like I’m visiting a friend. Before, I felt overwhelmed, annoyed, and frustrated. I had no incentive to keep my closet tidy, and putting outfits together was hard. There were never enough hangers or space to put things. Getting dressed took forever, and I frequently overlooked items I loved.

I feel so much more peace. I can easily see my clothes, and picking out what I’m going to wear feels like visiting a friend.

I decided to keep lighter-weight tops on the upper rod, and jackets, cardigans, and layering items live on the bottom rack. There is also a rod for longer dresses, as well as a rod for pants, skirts, and shorts.

Step 1: Edit, Edit, And Edit Again.

The absolute most important step in this process is to ruthlessly edit. I did a huge edit in January, but I needed to eliminate more things again in July. The crazy part — I’m still editing! Just yesterday I added more items to the donation bin. It feels so good. I might even like getting rid of things more than buying them! My husband would argue that’s not true… Maybe not, but it is certainly becoming that way.

It may seem like you’re getting rid of a lot of things, but organizers estimate that most of us only wear 20% of the clothes we own!

It feels so good to get rid of the visual clutter, and when I look into my closet, I absolutely love everything I see. Now that I’ve edited things down to my absolute favorites, the items that don’t belong there stick out like a sore thumb!

Discard everything that does not spark joy.

Marie Kondo

I have a bin in the back of my closet for things to donate. It also helps because I have a week or two to decide to take the item back out of the bin. The decision to let it go a lot easier because it’s not final yet. It may seem like you’re letting go of a lot of things, but organizers estimate that most of us only wear 20% of the clothes we own. Trust me, you won’t miss it!

Another trick to create a more visually pleasing space is to arrange clothes by color. Everything in my closet is arranged this way. Even looking at these photos, I know that I will continue to edit my closet further.

Step 2: Install Great Lighting

We have lived with terrible lighting in this closet for years. Why?! It was not expensive or time consuming to install new lights that are both beautiful and functional. It feels so luxurious to have pretty lights, and it cost me much less than a new designer handbag.

Clutter is the enemy of clarity.

Julia Cameron

I linked all of the organizers and lighting I used in this post, or you can find it on my Like to Know It post here. Keep in mind that those are affiliate links, and I’ll get a small commission — but only if you purchase something while the link is active in your browser.

Step 3: Make It Beautiful

This is the fun part, at least for me. I decided on a gorgeous mauve color, Cheslea Mauve by SW, as an accent in the closet. I wanted to use wallpaper, but nothing felt right. I haven’t decorated my master bedroom or bathroom yet, and I wanted those spaces to feel cohesive. Thankfully, Mr. Bayou is cool with pink in his closet!

The soft mauve is subtle, but it adds warmth and looks more “finished.” In person, the contrast is more noticeable.

I started by painting the ceiling, but I felt like it actually emphasized the attic door in the middle of the ceiling — not my preferred focal point! I ended up bringing the color down to the top shelf and around the door and back wall. It adds a small impact, and it makes the white shelving pop. I touched up the scuffs and scratches on the shelving, painted the closet rods white, and added a layer of finishing wax to protect heavily used surfaces, like the closet rods and shoe organizer.

When you invite people into your home, you invite them to see yourself.

Oprah Winfrey

Step 4: Organization

This space makes me feel like I’m at a boutique! I used inexpensive “S” hooks to hang shorts, sorted by color of course. Command hooks hold jewelry.

We want to jump to this step, but it’s actually the least important. Once I edited my stuff, I didn’t need to buy a ton of organizers. I purchased some accessory organizers, hooks, and a few more bins. Everything is linked here.

Behind the door, Command Hooks hold hats and provide a spot to stash pajamas and my bathrobe. I also added a small step stool, and a discreet pole with a hook provides access to the attic and replaces the unsightly string.

BUDGET BREAKDOWN
Paint $50
Materials $20
Lighting $200
Organizers $220
Money EARNED Selling Items $250

Total Cost: $240

I am so happy to have this completed! It was a lot of work, but I am inspired to tackle the next space. I’m not a big fan of “should” statements, but I’ll leave you with this: Your home should serve you well, and you should love being in it.

As always, thank you for stopping by today. I’m so glad you are a part of this adventure. Please reach out if you have any questions, need a link, or want to say, “Hi.” I mostly hang out on Instagram , but you can also find me Facebook. I share a weekly meal plan there too, so please check it out.

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Part 1: How to Declutter & Edit Your Closet

Up next for projects is my master bedroom closet! Originally, I planned to do my office, which is next to the foyer that I completed during the One Room Challenge. However, the cramped, crowded space was starting to add stress to my life, so closet it is!

Here is where I started…

Can you believe I cleaned it out over the holidays too?

It all began when we went to the beach a few weeks ago. We stayed in a nice three bedroom, two bath condo. Mr. Bayou and I were both amazed at how comfortable our family was in the space, even though it was over 1,000 square feet smaller than our house and missing a bedroom and bath. The sparse countertops, empty drawers and closets, and minimalist kitchen were the exact opposite of the overstuffed, superfluous spaces we had back home. The furniture was comfortable, sized appropriately to the space, with a great patio to sit and watch the waves.

Our favorite beach spot isn’t minimalist, but it is decluttered and comfortable. It’s Shipwatch 501A, if you’re looking for a place to stay in Perdido Key, FL.

What was really interesting is that my husband and I had the same reaction. We felt like we could breathe there. We decided that moving into a smaller home wasn’t the solution. We needed to pare down and declutter, and we needed to finish spaces that change the way we live in our home (like our back patio). We also realized that having a television in each child’s room is incredibly convenient, but that’s a different post…

The sparse countertops, empty drawers and closets, and minimalist kitchen were the exact opposite of the overstuffed, superfluous spaces we had back home.

Coming home from the beach, I wanted to dive in to every room and get to work. However, with school starting soon, working from home, and the fact that other people live here too, I decided that might not be the best idea. Instead, I plan to tackle things room-by-room.

One of my big takeaways from the One Room Challenge a few weeks ago was how rewarding it is to fully finish a space before moving on to the next project. So, I plan to do the same with decluttering.

My first thought was that I’m not naturally a very organized person. I’m more of a piler than a filer. I also really like stuff– the more the better. However, those thoughts aren’t helping me feel better in my home. That old thinking is being replaced by a new mantra, “I love having space in my home to live and grow. I’m thankful for all the things, but they aren’t serving me or my family well when it adds stress to our home.” I’ve watched decluttering shows, read books, and listened to podcasts, but it really hit home when I saw how living in an edited space affected my mood and made everyone feel more peaceful.

It’s time to declutter and be more purposeful and intentional about what I bring into my home. I hope you’re on board too!

That old thinking is being replaced by a new mantra, “I love having space in my home to live and grow. I’m thankful for all the things, but they aren’t serving me or my family well when it adds stress to our home.”

Master Closet: The Plan of Attack

Week 1: Edit extra items & declutter

Week 2: Relocate items that don’t belong

Week 3: Update lighting, clean shelves, & touch up paint

Week 4: Add organizers and bins to make it pretty and functional

I’m giving myself a month to do this project, because I know it’s a doozy. I have no intentions of becoming a minimalist or going extreme Marie Kondo (great book though!). However, a change is needed. I can’t wait to enjoy my updated space.

This closet renovation from Jenna Sue Design is so dreamy. My project won’t be this grand, but I love the fancy light and wallpaper on the ceiling. (SOURCE)

How to Edit & Declutter Your Closet

  1. Set Your Intention // This is really important if you want to be successful, and I think it was the thing missing last time I tried to get organized. I want my closet to be filled with items I LOVE and feel GREAT wearing. I also want to be able to FIND my things easily. An added bonus — I want to AVOID unnecessary purchases. Decide how to think about the stuff you’re going to sort through. Choose to focus on what this is going to do for you and how it will make you feel.
  2. Choose 3 Style Words // This part is the most fun to me. Choose three words that describe your style, even if it doesn’t describe you yet. My style words are SASSY, NEUTRAL, BOHEMIAN. Use these words to guide you when you’re unsure about whether to keep or toss something.
  3. Set aside time to get started // I took the better part of a day, but if that doesn’t work for you, break it up over a week into shorter bursts. The other reason I took so long is because my closet was packed to the brim! You could take 15 minutes each day and go through a small section at a time.
  4. Recruit a Buddy // I needed someone to tell me that it was ok to part with things that weren’t working for me, particularly items that were new or expensive. My 13-year-old daughter did great at this. Marriage tip: Don’t ask your husband. He might feel obligated to tell you that you look wonderful in everything or may cause you to question getting rid of something that was expensive or just isn’t your style.
  5. Try Everything On // This is really important, particularly if you’ve gained or lost weight. Remember, you are only keeping things you LOVE. A pair of jeans that are too tight are not going to make you feel good, even if they are new and cost a fortune. If you haven’t had major weight changes, you may be able to skip the try-on, but I still recommend it. It also forced me to really see how much stuff I had.
  6. Notice What Looks Great on You & Repeated Items // Do you look best in certain colors? Do you have 17 white tops? I noticed that I’m drawn to neutral and muted colors, and bright colors aren’t really my thing. However, I do look great in red. I also prefer off-white over white, and charcoal gray tops look better on me than black. I like a scoop or v-neck top, and I have enough white shirts to last several seasons. These observations will help guide purchases in the future. Make a note in your phone for later. Do you have a signature style or clothes that never really work for you? My style is skirts and dresses– I love wearing them. I really don’t like collared shirts or hoods because they get caught in my hair. What are yours?
  7. Edit the Excess // I used a few questions to guide me on what needed to go.
    -Is it in good condition? (Toss anything with stains, holes, etc.)
    -Will I really wear this, or will it sit in my closet five more years?
    -Do I have similar items that I prefer?
    -Do I love it?
    -Does it bring me joy?
  8. Make a List of What You Need // If you toss out all of your jeans, you might need to go shopping. I use my notes in my phone for this. Write what you’e looking for exactly. Ex: High rise medium wash straight leg jeans with no holes
  9. Be True to Your Style // I realize that I’m a style blogger and love trendy clothes, but not every trend works for me. It’s ok to stick to what you love and feel great wearing.-Does it fit well?
  10. Toss, Sell, or Donate Items // Toss the obvious items that aren’t in good shape. Then, decide whether you want to donate or sell what is left. If you’re planning to sell them, consider local resale shops or an online retailer. Before you send used clothes, ask about special requirements. Most resale shops won’t accept items with tags removed, for example. You can also sell clothes on Facebook Marketplace or in a garage sale, but it can be very time consuming. If you choose to donate clothes to a shelter or charity, make a list of what was donated and the condition of. the items. When you drop them off, ask for a donation receipt for tax purposes.
I found this pic on Instagram searching for closet ideas. I love how the clothes are grouped by color and everything is edited. (SOURCE)

Download the Cheat Sheet

I created a PDF to guide you through the activities for Week 1. Click the link below to download it for printing.

Download the PDF to help guide you through the editing process.

If you need more help with this, I highly recommend my coach, Edie Wadsworth. She just did a little mini class on this topic and will be digging in to this more in her coaching program soon. You can find out the details at www.lifeingrace.com.

I’d love it if some of you will join me and share your progress on social media. I still have quite a bit to do, including sorting through accessories and handbags.

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